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that it doesn't do anything the u.s. doesn't like or one which apparently on the surface has more love for it. at the same time it's disengaged. it's not fair for ambassador rice. her engagement is where it should be. she's living day and night in the accident occurty council that's where she should be. i think that those probably warfare criticism during the first two to three years of the first barack obama term. >> host: when has the u.s. sought u.n. legitimacy? >> guest: most of the time as a per let to actions that it was planning on taking anyway. so in iraq, we saw legitimacy for something the entire world knew we were going do no matter what. i would say that the u.s. seeks a less contentious program which is -- [inaudible] peace keeping operations in places in the world where we can't operate others and put our people at risk. and yet, both for reasons of our interest and values and ideals. we think it would be a good idea if somebody on the ground to maintain amenable oil. i think we see u.s. legitimacy for purpose where our -- >> host: and you write in the book living with the u.n.
neglect them. we've got 15 members and they are rotating in us at the other things that the u.n., these rotations that generally speaking, not contentious because they rotate on a fixed and geographic basis. they are sort of an order, so there's not as much fighting as you might think maybe over membership. it is important to understand we do require a vote not just of the p5, but you've got to get a supermajority of the 15 members of the apartment to agree for security council action to go forward. so it's not just a case to block anything, but they don't have the ability to make anything they like happened. the u.n. is quite possibly the most recognized and makes the department of defense leclair by comparison. >> host: what is the effect of ms.? what is the general assembly and is a defective? >> guest: the general assembly of the meeting place above the nations. everybody has one vote. everybody has the police. you see this every year when the world leaders line up at the opening of the u.n. years, in september they each make their speech. the good part of it is the place
there in that video this morning. they have the capability to be held and used to produce rapid fire. i asked a question on month ago, what purpose does serve in civilians hands are on the street. i haven't received an answer yet but they did blurt the second amendment. 2nd amendment. it wasn't about the 2nd amendment. i defend the second amendment. and i want to see that upheld and regulated and it hasn't been. when that was written on most 300 years ago we didn't have the weapons we have today in the technology. they had muskets and cannons. i think it was 1934 when the ban was put on machine guns, the regulation. we haven't had a mass killing with a machine gun since. i feel these so-called assault weapons that have certain characteristics should fall in that category and be banned. >> thank you mr. heslin, thank you very much. at one point steinbeck had to write a small paragraph that said basically, people are asking what happened. this was after his wife joined him in seattle and when he says we get is not charlie and john. and somebody must have said tim hey where's charlie? yes disapp
the tax code which everybody wants us to do. but also we have used a small percentage of that money to reduce the deficit. so it doesn't place too much burden on the operating structure of the country. >> so who is the one person in the white house and one person and the republican leadership who is most committed to making the tough choice because i think the one person in the white house is most authentically -- authentically committed to making is the president. i've met with him several times. i believe that he's willing to make these cuts in the entitlement programs that we have to make. that doesn't mean i don't want to continue to push them outside of his comfort zone to go a little further than you might want to go otherwise, but i think we're going to have to if we get a deal with republicans but again we'll have to push the republicans in order to do the tax reform, allows us to reduce the deficit in the same manner. >> how do you push a president? >> you know, the way i've done it is always candidly, open with him, not agree but tell them exactly what you think and why. t
how china will surpass us. he said that in the florida senate in 2011 and how we need each other. but that's diplomacy comest you can get a bit of a pass. senator hagel, key was had by the executive commission on china, but talk solely about development issues. rule of law and economic growth is fine. but that's not the job he's getting. he said absolutely nothing about the rise of china. he's also said absolutely nothing about he has had the defense department is going to do with the rise of china in an era of budget cuts to the defense department he supports. it's very troubling, fred has a great way of putting this consensus reality that in a sense it doesn't matter. so did not do the job better and you can take that for granted. japan for the first time in a decade has not just her and run defense budget, modestly $1.6 billion increase. it would be nice to see it continue, but everyone watches very carefully to see the leading indicator, which is us and what we're willing to do. taiwan is a country rushing to the exit to make sure nothing comes between it and china and theref
in the notion of an enlightened citizenry. some of us think that some of us think democracy is defined by the ritual of voting. in voting voting is important in a democracy but voting takes place all over the world, takes place in democracies, takes place in dictatorships, takes place in totalitarian societies. voting alone does not mean that we live in a free society. we live in a free society when it is based on an enlightened citizenry that takes that enlightenment into action, causing those whom we would elect to honor our ideals as a nation. >> dr. activist and transafrica founder randall robinson taking your calls, e-mails, facebook comments and tweets, in depth, this sunday at noon eastern on booktv on c-span2. >> my cartoons depict native humor. at first when i first started this cartoon they were native characters in native situations and my audience was geared towards natives but in the last four or five years they have become more universal where they spilled out into the main theme or dominant culture so it is more universal now. i am inspired by the people that i grew up w
. [laughter] >> nine-zip, you know. now, as some of you know, as doug said, we worked noth the u.s. attorney's office, but the notion i was his boss is a complete joke. but it's always a privilege to be with him today, and it's a privilege actually to be included in this important annual meeting. i'd particularly like to welcome this organization's newest members. 11 state attorneys general who are participating for the first time and i'd like to recognize and thank all the good friends and colleagues here today. thank you for lending your time, you diverse perspectives and your talent to this association's critical work. over the past four years i've been fortunate to work with many of the leaders in the room to confront range of criminal justice, law enforcement, and national security challenges. alongside my colleagues and court parts in the obama administration, including vice president biden, director cordray, and associate attorney general tony west, all of whom you're hearing from this week. we have accomplished, i think, a great deal working together with you across state boundaries
and efficiency. >> you used the word new poll which is a charge toward. >> if you look at the facts expenditure which comes up depending upon how you counter that over chilean dollars a year and you looked at what they are, look at things like the exemption of employer contributions to health care and mortgage interest deductions and iras and 401k and these are worthy charitable deductions come from a don't think most people think of those things as the polls. these are policy choices that we made, and then maybe the wrong policy choices, but nonetheless, they are not opposed to men that did nothing that is what fdr had in mind when you made that statement. now, there obviously are loopholes. we talked about carried interest , that should be capital gain on ordinary income for. many others that can be identified, and i think that certainly that is something that for the stake of perceived fairness for economic equity and so forth that we should be going after. i don't think it is beautiful. think it is just probably unfortunate that people think that you should do that and sell the budget probl
are talking about the divisions that cause people to start thinking like enemies, still very much with us. [applause] >> i want to thank taylor branch for being with us tonight. he will be signing books in the library. i want to thank the livingston foundation for sponsoring this lecture and it anybody in california is listening please -- we could really use it. thank you very much. [applause] >> for more information visit the author's website taylor branch.com. >> to take booktv is in savannah, ga. for live coverage of the savannah book festival starting at 10:15 eastern with nobel prize winner and former vice president al gore on the future. 11:thirty-fourth and eighty psychologist heidi squire craft on rule number 2, lessons i've learned in a combat hospital. at 1:30 cnn's chief washington correspondent jake tamper on the war in afghanistan from the outpost. 2:45 presidential historian kevin thomas on ike's glove. at 4:00 pillage a prize-winning historian gerri willis asks why priests. the savannah book festival part of three days of booktv this president's day weekend on c-span2. >> n
american and u.s. air in the really raleigh market? >> we -- the overlap, i think is just on the washington, d.c., flight. american serves the hubs for raleigh we serve our hubs from there. i think the overlap is limited to the one flight. >> all right. and i noticed -- and the prices on american and u.s. airways are virtually the same flying out of raleigh occur ram to d.c. how much overlap do you have in charlotte. >> virtually zero. we have a very large connecting hub in charlotte. >> all right. i believe u.s. air serves d.c. out of charlotte, i think they are probably the carrier that has the most flights out of charlotte to d.c. what years years would you anticipate the price difference is from raleigh to d.c. and charlotte to d.c. is? >> i don't know. it sounds like you might know. [laughter] >> it costas lot more money to fly from charlotte to d.c. than raleigh to washington. that's concerning. it's very concerning. and you're direct competitors in a route from raleigh to washington where as u.s. airways it doesn't have a direct competitor, so it costs more money. that would certainl
reality hits us. we have a job to do. we have to take of the thing that is the most pressing on the front end, and, unfortunately, that's kind of the environment we are living in. and it was a very interesting panel, especially the last one, where i was hearing, there's nothing better than congressional staffers. actually talk to patients are going through the clinic. one of the things that, the reality that we suffer with, unfortunately and this is something we all have to deal with come is just the fiscal reality. as you rightly pointed out, it is right now the debate is about budget and at, people are can't figure out to control costs but also how to find actual savings that are scored by cbo. the congressional budget office gets a bad rap from a lot of people, but i'm a fan to have a very tough job to do. they always come out with answers that doesn't please one side or the other side, but trust me it's a very tough job that they have have had to do, and it's hard to please everyone in a town like washington, d.c. they try to do the best they can. i of fort a lot of respect to them. b
difficult to negotiate a treaty, but to agree on legal principles such as a country can use lethal force against a terrorist in another country whose threat and attack if that country is unwilling or unable to prevent that thread. in most cases around the world, the countries are able to prevent that thread. they can arrest the person. but in four or five countries, yemen, somalia, pakistan want to get countries around the world to acknowledge the united states right under international law to use force to kill someone in another country who is posing a threat when it can't be addressed in another way. we can get there, but they're just not going to agree to our position unless we go through aggressive international legal diplomacy. it's a great kind of questions. >> and they are the likely position that some would take the point to this hearing and the debates in this country? or have a hard enough time coming to terms with this idea that the very earliest stages of the potential that drones will offer. there have been a hard nut time coming to terms under our constitution and now we'll
used to have officers from other schools come in and ab serve our training -- and observe our training at the school of infantry. so-a captain who would come over from camp johnson, which is where the admin is. so we're on the pt field, and we just got done with a run, and they're, you know, doing their round robin training stations, and there's a pull-up bar. and i had two of my staff ncos, the women, were up on the pull-up bar. and the captain says to me, you know, women are up on the pull-up bar. and i said, yeah, i know, they do pull-ups, they train with the marines, that's the way it works. women can't do pull-ups. [laughter] and we're standing 5 feet away from -- [laughter] and i said they're doing pull-ups. and he goes, they -- no. i mean, really, they can't do like real pull-ups. and i'm like, that's a real pull-up. he thinks they're wasting their time because they're not going to be evaluated to do pull-ups. you're wasting their time. and i said, have you ever asked your marines to do a pull-up? and he goes, no. ful i never asked them nothing that they couldn't do. so there's
be very dangerous for us to let him think that that is acceptable behavior. so this may be changing north korea's tolerance for risk. and the fact kim jong-un may be under the assumption that we are becoming even more risk and tolerant -- and tolerant. that we will be risk averse and cost of first a look at our budgeting paper cutting back on our operational capacity, a special with sequestration threatening at the end of this month. kim jong-un may be reading this headline to the sequestration thinking, united states couldn't afford to operate. who knows what he thinks on these issues? that it's very, very dangerous to let him think that this is something that's going to be acceptable. of course, it's deeply dangerous to threatening and do not to act on it. so we have to be very serious when we make decisions as a government on what to do. i think we're also emboldening iran. iran's latest action on nuclear proliferation can partly be explained by the successful missile and nuclear launch from north korea. so these are feeding age of the. it's collaborative. and it is very dangerous. now
because jess is going to give us a good taste of what he's been writing about. but i did want to introduce jess, the person. he's someone i got to know a few years ago when we were both traveling from washington, d.c. to to williamsburg, and the train, amtrak broke down, and we grabbed a car and rode down together and had just an extraordinarily enjoyable time because jess is, as i think most people know, one of the leading legal reporters in the united states. but what they may not know is his, you know, he's a person of extraordinary humor and wit. and so i want to expose a little bit of that to you right now because when he was in college at harvard, he was roommates with, what, peter say gal of, wait, wait, don't tell me. and they were both members of not -- they were not the harvard crimson crowd, they were the harvard lampoon along with the head of the lampoon at that time, conan o'brien. i've been told this elaborate story, i'm not sure i'm going to be able to get all the details right about he and his cronies contriving to arrange an invitation to harvard to speak as a pan of lette
, and responsiveness. he serves us. we don't serve him. he serves the american people. the american people send their money to washington and they expect it will be honestly and openly managed, accountable. they have every right to demand high performance from all officials, but particularly the director of the office of office of management and budget. surely there can be no higher duty for such an important official than to periodically report to the people truthfully on the importance affairs of state. specifically, to report the financial condition of the nation and to produce a budget plan that will fix it. without doubt, the great challenge of our time is how to confront effectively the unsustainable debt course we're now on. that is clearly the greatest threat to our republic. admiral mullen, the former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff said debt is the greatest threat to our national security. we are heading to a financial crisis if we don't change. all experts have told us that, including the simpson and bowles of the president's debt commission. they said -- quote -- "this nation
increase in our fertility rates. that's the baby boom. that's the term which gets us. it really was a remarkable moment. it not only was the fertility rate increase quite i can put up to as high as 3.7 i think white americans and i think 3.9 for black americans, not only did it jump up but instead of for an entire generation, a really long lasting effect. people change the way they live for generations. again by 1970 that momentum, that moment had ended and we saw not a gradual float down but really the fertility rate dropping off the cliff. >> jonathan last and how changing demographics and birth rates could cause the u.s. to lose its place as a world leader. sunday night at nine eastern on "after words" on c-span2. look for more booktv online, like us on facebook. >> now, a discussion on a state of libertarianism hosted by the cato institute. this hour-long forum includes a look at gun control, federal spending, and cases coming before the supreme court. >> i'm going to shorten everyone's bio in order to get to them. our first bigger is the executive vice president of the cato
commander of u.s. forces in iraq general loy austin to lead the command which is responsible for operations of middle east and afghanistan. general austin was joined by u.s. command nominee general david rodriguez who is a top commander in afghanistan from 2007 to 2011. this hearing is chaired by carl levin of michigan. it is two hours. >> good morning everybody and welcome this morning that committee considers the nomination of two very distinguished officers to the two of the most active and challenging combatant commands. general lloyd austin united states army nominated to the commander u.s. central command, and general david rodriquez, u.s. army to be nominated to be commander of the u.s. africa command. fees' to combat and commands, centcom and africom are the centers of gravity for the military's operations to counter the threat of terrorism. both nominees have served the country with distinction, and i want to faint each of you for your decades of military service and a willingness to serve once again. i and stand general austin's life and rodriguez's life are with us this morning.
panetta said it would be irresponsible for the congress to allow it to happen. many of us agree, it must be avoided. but apart from that challenge in the next month, or series of months, the long-term outlook for the department of defense is that it must do more with less, and secretary hagel, if he is confirmed, will have that management task, and he is one of the people in this country who is almost uniquely qualified to carry it out. and i believe that he will with great distinction. he will take care of our men and women in uniform and strengthen our national defense, he will do what he thinks is right even if it's not popular, and he is, finally, as everyone has said, a good and decent man. i thank in particular senator mccain for his very compelling and telling comment during our consideration before the vote in the armed services committee. he said -- and i agree -- no one should impugn chuck hagel's character. he's a person of integrity and character. and i believe that he will have the respect at all levels of our defense, men and women who serve and sacrifice every day, men and
, in fact, the government is doing a lot of good things and then got us through the great depression. there was a paper written on this a couple of years ago. it was estimated that without these policy responses, we would have been looking at a rate we have not seen since the 1930s. no one can know for sure, but it would have been a lot worse. i think it is important to have a understanding of why the federal reserve did what it did, why we had the stimulus package, it did in fact raise the deficit. we all know that the deficits are a bad thing. bigger deficits are bad, other things were not all that close and there was a rationale. the biggest message of the book was the rationale, this paradox that there were massive markets that ran amok. they went off the track. the government came in not perfectly, but pretty effectively to try to put things back on track. at the end of the day we witness, and you have all witnesses, is quite sharp backlash. americans have never liked big government. but there was a reason for government interventions. it was a market failure in the financial wo
-- and i'm coming back to that -- is liable to hamstring us as a society the next time newing remotely like in this happens. just imagine if europe had blown up financially as looked possible six months ago but doesn't look very likely at all right now. so we got what the markets were calling the lehman ii scenario. what would have been the chances of getting through the congress another stimulus, another t.a.r.p. or anything like that? as a lot of people in this room know, you can dam any piece of -- damn any piece of legislation now by saying like t.a.r.p.. people have this view that t.a.r.p. was a failure, that it robbed taxpayers of $700 billion to dole out cash to undeserving bankers. the only part of that sentence that is accurate is the adverb "undeserving." [laughter] they were undeserving. they didn't deserve it. but when the ship is sinking, you don't quite worry about just desserts until you make sure the ship doesn't sink. but, in fact, the t.a.r.p. was a tremendous success. it -- the financial parts of t.a.r.p.. you may recall t.a.r.p. didn't start getting used for everything i
sitting on the sideline at us '02 negative zero interest-rate environment, why do you believe further quantitative easing will cause entrepreneurs and job creators to put this capital to work? . .er: under the previous order there will be eight hours of debate equally divided in the usual form. mr. baucus: madam president, america's first treasury secretary alexander hamilton once said -- and i quote -- "the confidence of the people will easily be gained by a good administration. this is the true touchstone. hamilton's words take on a new prominence today as we test our next treasury secretary to gain the trust of the american people and restore confidence in our nation's economy. 19 of 24 senators in the senate finance committee voted yesterday on a bipartisan basis in favor of jack lews's nomination. senators on both sides of the aisle spoke to his character and to his integrity. he's well qualified to be the nation's next treasury secretary and equipped to restore confidence and trust in our economy. that will be his touchstone. i am certainly not alone in supporting mr. lew for th
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